Author Topic: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?  (Read 1804 times)

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Offline hrossik

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Re: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2015, 02:15:32 pm »
An immediate and effective solution to this issue is actually very simple. Malicious delegates will likely be delegates that don't produce blocks or produce blocks and steal 100% of the inflation. Both scenarios are by themselves quite unlikely and not actually that hurtful to BitShares, but most importantly they are easy to detect and it's possible to see what accounts control the stake that voted for them. To ensure the malicious stake doesn't continue ruining things a hard fork can be manually circulated among the community that permanently destroys all the stake that voted for the malicious delegates. BitShares would be back up and running normally quite quickly, and the only person who would really be hurt would be the attacker.

Destroying all the stake is less than ideal. I don't think there is a way how to discriminate between votes really intended for the malicious delegate and votes selected with "vote random subset" and "vote as delegates recommend".

I know it would be probably just a small portion of votes, but in principle it wouldn't be right.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2015, 02:21:18 pm by hrossik »
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Offline biophil

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Re: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2015, 02:24:01 pm »
An immediate and effective solution to this issue is actually very simple. Malicious delegates will likely be delegates that don't produce blocks or produce blocks and steal 100% of the inflation. Both scenarios are by themselves quite unlikely and not actually that hurtful to BitShares, but most importantly they are easy to detect and it's possible to see what accounts control the stake that voted for them. To ensure the malicious stake doesn't continue ruining things a hard fork can be manually circulated among the community that permanently destroys all the stake that voted for the malicious delegates. BitShares would be back up and running normally quite quickly, and the only person who would really be hurt would be the attacker.

Destroying all the stake is less than ideal. I don't think there is a way how to discriminate between votes really intended for the malicious delegate and votes selected with "vote random subset" and "vote as delegates recommend".

I know it would be probably just a small portion of votes, but in principle it wouldn't be right.

"vote random subset" means "vote for a random few of the delegates that I've approved in my wallet." So even when you have that option checked (as you generally should for the sake of your privacy), you're never voting for delegates that you haven't already specifically approved.

I'm not sure how "vote as delegates recommend" works.
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Offline clayop

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Re: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2015, 03:11:11 pm »
An immediate and effective solution to this issue is actually very simple. Malicious delegates will likely be delegates that don't produce blocks or produce blocks and steal 100% of the inflation. Both scenarios are by themselves quite unlikely and not actually that hurtful to BitShares, but most importantly they are easy to detect and it's possible to see what accounts control the stake that voted for them. To ensure the malicious stake doesn't continue ruining things a hard fork can be manually circulated among the community that permanently destroys all the stake that voted for the malicious delegates. BitShares would be back up and running normally quite quickly, and the only person who would really be hurt would be the attacker.

Thanks. This is clear answer for me.
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Offline xeroc

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Re: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2015, 03:14:09 pm »
I'm not sure how "vote as delegates recommend" works.

From:
http://wiki.bitshares.org/index.php/DPOS/ApprovalVoting

Quote
Vote as Delegates Recommended
    Some users publish a set of delegates (a slate) they recommend. Theses delegates fulfill certain criteria that are defined by the particular users. As an example: A user only recommends delegates whose real-world identities are known and verified. Another user recommends delegates that are trusted members of the bitsharestalk.org forum. And so on. If that user is a delegate and you vote for him with a wallet_transfer, you can also vote for all of his recommended delegates by choosing
    Vote as Delegates Recommended

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Offline santaclause102

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Re: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2015, 08:44:52 pm »
An immediate and effective solution to this issue is actually very simple. Malicious delegates will likely be delegates that don't produce blocks or produce blocks and steal 100% of the inflation. Both scenarios are by themselves quite unlikely and not actually that hurtful to BitShares, but most importantly they are easy to detect and it's possible to see what accounts control the stake that voted for them. To ensure the malicious stake doesn't continue ruining things a hard fork can be manually circulated among the community that permanently destroys all the stake that voted for the malicious delegates. BitShares would be back up and running normally quite quickly, and the only person who would really be hurt would be the attacker.
Stealing is not objective. What about a dev that doesn't really work (effectively)?


Offline fluxer555

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Re: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2015, 08:47:21 pm »
An immediate and effective solution to this issue is actually very simple. Malicious delegates will likely be delegates that don't produce blocks or produce blocks and steal 100% of the inflation. Both scenarios are by themselves quite unlikely and not actually that hurtful to BitShares, but most importantly they are easy to detect and it's possible to see what accounts control the stake that voted for them. To ensure the malicious stake doesn't continue ruining things a hard fork can be manually circulated among the community that permanently destroys all the stake that voted for the malicious delegates. BitShares would be back up and running normally quite quickly, and the only person who would really be hurt would be the attacker.
Stealing is not objective. What about a dev that doesn't really work (effectively)?

Or, what about an account squatter who receives funds from others when they are careless?

Offline bytemaster

Re: What if I have 11% of BTS and I am malicious?
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2015, 08:57:14 pm »
First of all an attacker attempting to steal 100% of the dilution and produce nothing would have to first pay 2 weeks worth of pay * 101 slots.   That would cost about $100,000 or more.  As long as the network could vote them out in less than 2 weeks that isn't a problem.

Only an attacker that takes over and then stops including transactions would require a "hard fork".   I suspect that it would be trivial for any of the previously elected delegates to black list transactions that vote for the attacker.  They could then easily hard fork out the transactions that voted in the attacking delegates and block any future transactions that would vote for them. 
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